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Latest News

EconCore joins Audi and others to develop composite battery casings EconCore is pleased to announce a partnership involving AZL, Audi and others to establish the potential of using composites for battery housings.

[view details]23-11-2020

Composite materials for lighter vehicles The automotive industry has long been seeking to find a cost-effective solution to weight reduction.

[view details]20-10-2020

EconCore proud to be key partner of sustainable concept LUCA car EconCore, is proud to be a major partner of an innovative project to build a car made entirely out of recycled materials by the TU/ecomotive team at Eindhoven University of Technology, launched on 8 October 2020.

[view details]08-10-2020

Job openings Are you interested to actively participate in the growth of EconCore?

[view details]01-10-2020

JEC Composites Webinar Thermoplastic Honeycomb Sandwich Panel Technology – Meeting the Cost-Efficiency and Sustainability Targets

[view details]17-09-2020

Task-distribution

Technology_SandwichTechnology
The task of the core
In lightweight sandwich constructions the core is usually relatively thick and has a much lower density compared to the skins. The primary mechanical requirement for the core layer is to prevent the movement of the skins relative to each other (in-plane and out-of-plane). Sufficient out-of-plane compression properties of the sandwich core are required to support the skins to maintain their distance from the neutral axis, to prevent them from buckling and to restrict their deformations due to local out-of-plane loads. Furthermore, sufficient out-of-plane shear properties of the core are demanded to restrict in-plane displacement of the skins relative to each other due to bending moments and transverse loads. The core layer can furthermore have additional functions e.g. thermal and acoustic isolation or energy absorption during impact.

The task of the skins
The skin layers in sandwich constructions carry the in-plane tensile/compression stresses and in-plane shear stresses. They are usually relatively thin and have a high stiffness and strength. In addition to high mechanical in-plane properties per weight the skin material usually has to fulfill also other requirements like low costs, high surface quality and good impact performance.



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